Tag Archives: glas juwele

Fossil vitra

Fossil vitra is a technique using natural materials such as leafs and branches or even feathers, glass frit, mica or enamel powders and the heat of the kiln to create an imprint on the glass.

Vitra is a word that refers to glass. So basically one is creating an artificial imprint fossil in glass. Amazing, isn’t it?

Remember that glass wants to flow or shrink to 6mm thickness, take that into account when you plan your pendant. I have cut a double layer of glass to provide the appropriate thickness more or less.I have also rounded the corners a bit, as I didn’t want to fuse my pendant into an oval. Remember to scrub the edges properly under running water to remove all glass dust when you cold work any piece. That prevents dull areas after fusing.

The leaf was then laid onto the glass to visualize my end product, and to make sure that the intended image will look well balanced with the background.The leaf was sprayed with hairspray to create a sticky surface that would dry quickly. Ordinary hairspray.Then I liberally added gold mica powder to cover the surface and shaked it gently to remove excess. The leaf was placed on kiln paper on the base, shiny side up. The mica powder was bought online from Wish. This mica turned gray when I tried to cap it in a different piece.My glass was placed upside down onto the leaf as according to my plan above. Then into the kiln it went.I unfortunately can’t provide you with a fusing schedule, as I never use fixed schedules. Every kiln and microwave have their own hotspots and your type of glass also has an influence. My microwave more or less forty years old! What I always recommend is that you must often peep. Remember to use eye protection for the glare when you do!The picture below might give you an indication of the amount of fusing done.And then it was the wait for cooling down and proper annealing to take place before opening the kiln.The leaf burns away completely in the way I use the technique. Only the mica layer that is in contact with the glass will fuse into the glass. That means that there will still be excess mica that you have to brush or wash off before adding your bail.

Eventually time to enjoy a beautiful, unique pendant. As I have planned, it didn’t fuse into an oval and the corners have a soft rounded effect without my pendant having a formal rectangular shape.

Defitrification

Defitrification is a swear word amongst glass fusers. Devitrification (“devit”) is the growth of crystalline structures within or on the surface of glass. (“Vitri” = glass; “devitrification” = the process of becoming un-glasslike).

I received a piece of beautiful white, orange and yellow from a friend after teaching her fusing glass in a microwave kiln.Her pendant came out perfect. We have cut strips and put it side by side upright before fusing it.

I wanted to make a similar pendant but was not satisfied with the pattern and decided to snip it in pieces with my mosaic tile cutter and fuse the puddle again.To my disgust the cabochon showed several small spots of defitrification. I cut it again in pieces and the same happened.

After cutting and nuking it more several times, the whole upper surface became defitrified. But I was adamant NOT to chuck that piece of glass, because by now the patterns that developed were really beautiful…

I then used my stained glass grinder and grinded off the whole upper surface. An old toothbrush has a second life in my workplace. It was used to scrub off all signs of glass dust that can make dull spots in glass. Some people soak their glass in vinegar after cold working it, but I just scrub thoroughly. It is much quicker and more effective.

The piece went into the kiln again and as it didn’t have to fuse into a nice shape again, I could just do a fire polish.

Yay! A beautiful smooth surface with beautiful patterns… BUT… with all the cutting and re-fusing, a small piece of black got trapped and it was NOT contributing to the beauty of my cabochon.I am not one to give up easily and made a plan…

I added a dandelion decal and viola!The actual pendant is more beautiful than what is depicted in the photo. Glass is really difficult subjects to photograph, but here it is… the most cut and fused piece from my studio yet!

Fusing decals in the microwave kiln

Decals open up a whole new range of possibilities. Today I cooked my first decal in my microwave kiln and I am sooo excited!

South Africa is a beautiful country but some craft supplies are not easy to come by, so you have to import it. Apart from the dollar exchange rate we face, the months – yes, months! that we have to wait for our customs to clear our parcels are quite a challenge.

So a few months ago I ordered some decals from Captive Decals. It was immediately shipped but only arrived this week.

I fused a test piece of glass a while back in anticipation of the arrival of my decals and yesterday was the day…

Oh! Imagine me reading the instructions that say wait 24h after applying the decal before fusing it…

So, today then was the day… The microwave that I use for fusing is very old and have settings for low, medium and high. I started with low and gradually went to high in increments of two minutes. I occasionally peeped and saw the background turned brown as it was burning away. I fused it just until I saw that the glass was at melting temperature and then immediately stopped and allowed the kiln to cool down outside on a heat resistance tile.

I love the way the glass changed and I love my first decal pendant.

Variety of pendants

I almost forgot to post my latest pendants on this blog and not only on my Facebook page.

Most of them are for sale, visit my Facebook page Kobie’s Crafts @kobiescrafts for prices.

Blou en groen saam is altyd mooi

Vyf lae perfekte reghoekies vat hulle eie pad in my oondjie.

Hierdie was nog van my Desember projekte wat ek al vergeet het om te plaas. Die pewter hoendertjies was amper klaar maar moet nou eers bietjie oorstaan tot daar weer tyd is.

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Buiten pers is dit my gunsteling kleure die